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FAQ-Supplements for breast growth


Lotus

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(15-01-2016, 12:38 AM) Lotus Wrote: Here's an example of what how interactions can happen, multiplying its effects. Say you drink green tea (a CYP17 inhibitor of testosterone). Now because you add piperine (in certain supplements, or added by supplementing) it increases the EGCG (polyphenols) in green tea by 1.3 fold. 


J Nutr. 2004 Aug;134(8):1948-52.
Piperine enhances the bioavailability of the tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate in mice.
Lambert JD1, Hong J, Kim DH, Mishin VM, Yang CS.
Author information
Abstract
(-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), from green tea (Camellia sinensis), has demonstrated chemopreventive activity in animal models of carcinogenesis. Previously, we reported the bioavailability of EGCG in rats (1.6%) and mice (26.5%). Here, we report that cotreatment with a second dietary component, piperine (from black pepper), enhanced the bioavailability of EGCG in mice. Intragastric coadministration of 163.8 micromol/kg EGCG and 70.2 micromol/kg piperine to male CF-1 mice increased the plasma C(max) and area under the curve (AUC) by 1.3-fold compared to mice treated with EGCG only. Piperine appeared to increase EGCG bioavailability by inhibiting glucuronidation and gastrointestinal transit. Piperine (100 micromol/L) inhibited EGCG glucuronidation in mouse small intestine (by 40%) but not in hepatic microsomes. Piperine (20 micromol/L) also inhibited production of EGCG-3"-glucuronide in human HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Small intestinal EGCG levels in CF-1 mice following treatment with EGCG alone had a C(max) = 37.50 +/- 22.50 nmol/g at 60 min that then decreased to 5.14 +/- 1.65 nmol/g at 90 min; however, cotreatment with piperine resulted in a C(max) = 31.60 +/- 15.08 nmol/g at 90 min, and levels were maintained above 20 nmol/g until 180 min. This resulted in a significant increase in the small intestine EGCG AUC (4621.80 +/- 1958.72 vs. 1686.50 +/- 757.07 (nmol/g.min)). EGCG appearance in the colon and the feces of piperine-cotreated mice was slower than in mice treated with EGCG alone. The present study demonstrates the modulation of the EGCG bioavailablity by a second dietary component and illustrates a mechanism for interactions between dietary chemicals.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?filte...%5Bauth%5D


(09-01-2016, 04:52 AM) Lotus Wrote: Hi BN, 

Here's a new idea to try...........citrus for breast growth (I'll explain). Three key enzymes (cyp 17, cyp 19, cyp 3A4) have direct pathways to breast/androgen synthesis. Cyp 3A4 controls more than 50% of how drugs are metabolized (I'd say that's a major regulator to piggy back off of), the only only issue there is mapping out all these key regulators, (it's like mapping out the genome).


Example: star fruit inhibits CY3A, more potent than grapefruit, ((which if you didn't notice, inhibiting CY3A4 will help with breast growth)).


Potent inhibition by star fruit of human cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) activity.
Hidaka M1, Fujita K, Ogikubo T, Yamasaki K, Iwakiri T, Okumura M, Kodama H, Arimori K.
Author information
Abstract
There has been very limited information on the capacities of tropical fruits to inhibit human cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) activity. Thus, the inhibitory effects of tropical fruits on midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activity of CYP3A in human liver microsomes were evaluated. Eight tropical fruits such as common papaw, dragon fruit, kiwi fruit, mango, passion fruit, pomegranate, rambutan, and star fruit were tested. We also examined the inhibition of CYP3A activity by grapefruit (white) and Valencia orange as controls. The juice of star fruit showed the most potent inhibition of CYP3A. The addition of a star fruit juice (5.0%, v/v) resulted in the almost complete inhibition of midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activity (residual activity of 0.1%). In the case of grape-fruit, the residual activity was 14.7%. The inhibition depended on the amount of fruit juice added to the incubation mixture (0.2-6.0%, v/v). The elongation of the preincubation period of a juice from star fruit (1.25 or 2.5%, v/v) with the microsomal fraction did not alter the CYP3A inhibition, suggesting that the star fruit did not contain a mechanism-based inhibitor. Thus, we discovered filtered extracts of star fruit juice to be inhibitors of human CYP3A activity in vitro.
PMID: 15155547 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Free full text

Here's what I'm thinking, tropicial fruits blocks the androgen pathway, like the enzyme CYP 17 does (inhibit androgen)........and, cyp 19 (is an aromatase promoter).

Inhibit CYP3A4
Inhibit CYP17
induce CYP19  

In think incorporating a tropical fruit (call it a lotion?) massage, also adding a polyphenol (green tea extract, androgen inhibitor for max potential). Oral intake will still be the biggest bang though.

Anyways, with help from the one fella, I've got a head start on some of the enzymes (call them coregulators) mapped out. I'll post asap. 

This is exciting stuff no? Who knew fruits would prove to be pro breast growth, and a healthy approach too. TongueBig Grin


(03-03-2016, 05:16 AM) Lotus Wrote: This is worth mentioning again, 

Lemons inhibit CYP3A4, and @ 60%?.......,,,,,,,,its pro breast growth.  

Application to drug-food interactions of living cells as in vitro model expressing cytochrome P450 activity: enzyme inhibition by lemon juice.
Baltes MR1, Dubois JG, Hanocq M.
Author information
Abstract
Classical inhibitors of human cytochrome P450 3A4 activity, such as ketoconazole and quercetin, are tested to prove the efficiency of a new metabolisation model using living entire cells. Grapefruit juice is a well-known potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450 3A4 activity. With regard to the clinical relevance of grapefruit juice-drug interactions, an investigation of other common juices is undertaken with this in vitro model. The CYP3A4 activity is measured by the formation of the 6beta-hydroxytestosterone, which is quantified by an isocratic high performance liquid chromatography. It is demonstrated for the first time that lemon juice significantly inhibits by 60+/-3% the CYP3A4-mediated oxidation. Grapefruit juice inhibits this activity by 82+/-4%. The mechanism of lemon juice inhibition is competitive, whereas it is mixed for grapefruit juice. These results suggest that our in vitro model combined with our analytical method is applicable for the investigation of the inhibition of CYP3A4 not only by chemical inhibitors but also by natural food products.


Whole Lemons are fairly inexpensive, in drinks or on food.....lemons boost the NBE/Hrt blood levels by the CYP3A4 enzyme pathway.......meaning most the drugs in your medicine cabinet. Rolleyes

Lotus

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Posts: 1,621
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Pharmacokinetic Interactions of Herbs with Cytochrome P450 and P-Glycoprotein 
http://downloads.hindawi.com/journals/ec...736431.pdf

concurrent use of drugs and herbal products is becoming increasingly prevalent over the last decade. Several herbal products have been known to modulate cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) which are recognized as representative drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporter, respectively. us, a summary of knowledge on the modulation of CYP and P-gp by commonly used herbs can provide robust fundamentals for optimizing CYP and/or P-gp substrate drug-based therapy. Herein, we review ten popular medicinal and/or dietary herbs as perpetrators of CYP- and P-gp-mediated pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions. e main focus is placed on previous works on the ability of herbal extracts and their phytochemicals to modulate the expression and function of CYP and P-gp in several in vitro and in vivo animal and human systems. 


Medication & Herbal Inhibitors of the Cytochrome P450 (CYP) Enzymes Drug 
https://www.ebmconsult.com/content/pages...inhibitors

_____________________

This is positive step forward in identifying herbal pathways.  Smile
L.

Lotus

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Posts: 1,621
Threads: 58
Joined: Aug 2013

Hi BN,

I'm listing this post from breastnexum forum, hopefully you'll find it to BEE helpful.  Shy

(03-09-2017, 02:44 AM) Lotus Wrote:
(02-09-2017, 11:48 PM) EndlessEden_mn2010 Wrote: Looking Great lotus, and sitting tight for that update. This girl needs to know your secret!


right, so sorry for they delay. Tbh, it's a sticky mess but worth the effort for enhanced areolas. It's called " Royal Jelly "....I find applying RJ to areolas to benefit the size and shape of areolas....also breasts if one is willing to manage the mess. Application is sticky..(did I mention that already,lol) use a food grade platstic wrap per area and let it overnight...in the morning nearly all the RJ is absorbed, shower and see results either immediately or throughout the day. This may/or may not work for everyone, it is pollen after all.

As time permits I will be posting new evidence about how IGF-1 (insulin growth factor) and E2 (estradiol) is the next revolution in breast growth.


J Med Food. 2012 Jun;15(6):568-75. doi: 10.1089/jmf.2011.1888. Epub 2012 Apr 2.
Royal jelly increases collagen production in rat skin after ovariectomy.

Park HM1, Cho MH, Cho Y, Kim SY.
Author information
Abstract
Royal jelly (RJ) is a honeybee product that contains proteins, carbohydrates, fats, free amino acids, vitamins, and minerals. RJ has been reported to have antitumor, antibacterial, and wound-healing activities. We previously reported that RJ enhanced the migration of human dermal fibroblasts and altered the levels of cholesterol and sphinganine in an in vitro wound-healing model in addition to regulating skin photoaging following exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation. We established an animal model of skin aging in the context of estrogen deficiency and assessed the antiaging effects of RJ on skin. To establish an in vivo model of skin aging, bilateral ovariectomies were performed in 12-week-old virgin female Sprague-Dawley rats. Induction of osteoporosis was confirmed through two-dimensional images of the trabecular bone in the left femoral necks using microcomputed tomography. The protective effects of RJ ovariectomy-induced skin aging were examined by determining the protein expression of type I procollagen and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1. The collagen content and epidermal thickness of skin tissue were measured by staining techniques. There was a significant difference in weight between sham-operated and ovariectomized groups. Food efficiency ratio did not differ significantly among the groups. The level of procollagen type I protein was increased in the dorsal skin of ovariectomized rats fed with a dietary supplement containing 1% RJ extract, but the level of MMP-1 was not altered. In particular, the amount of collagen recovered was close to the normal level. RJ may protect against skin aging by enhancing collagen production in rats with ovariectomy-induced estrogen deficiency.
PMID: 22468645 PMCID: PMC3359633 DOI: 10.1089/jmf.2011.1888
[Indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC Article


Bioactive compounds and health-promoting properties of royal jelly: A review
http://medicata.lt/wp-content/uploads/20...review.pdf


Fatty acids derived from royal jelly are modulators of estrogen receptor functions.
Moutsatsou P1, Papoutsi Z, Kassi E, Heldring N, Zhao C, Tsiapara A, Melliou E, Chrousos GP, Chinou I, Karshikoff A, Nilsson L, Dahlman-Wright K.
Author information

Abstract
Royal jelly (RJ) excreted by honeybees and used as a nutritional and medicinal agent has estrogen-like effects, yet the compounds mediating these effects remain unidentified. The possible effects of three RJ fatty acids (FAs) (10-hydroxy-2-decenoic-10H2DA, 3,10-dihydroxydecanoic-3,10DDA, sebacic acid-SA) on estrogen signaling was investigated in various cellular systems. In MCF-7 cells, FAs, in absence of estradiol (E(2)), modulated the estrogen receptor (ER) recruitment to the pS2 promoter and pS2 mRNA levels via only ERβ but not ERα, while in presence of E(2) FAs modulated both ERβ and ERα. Moreover, in presence of FAs, the E(2)-induced recruitment of the EAB1 co-activator peptide to ERα is masked and the E(2)-induced estrogen response element (ERE)-mediated transactivation is inhibited. In HeLa cells, in absence of E(2), FAs inhibited the ERE-mediated transactivation by ERβ but not ERα, while in presence of E(2), FAs inhibited ERE-activity by both ERβ and ERα. Molecular modeling revealed favorable binding of FAs to ERα at the co-activator-binding site, while binding assays showed that FAs did not bind to the ligand-binding pocket of ERα or ERβ. In KS483 osteoblasts, FAs, like E(2), induced mineralization via an ER-dependent way.
Our data propose a possible molecular mechanism for the estrogenic activities of RJ's components which, although structurally entirely different from E(2), mediate estrogen signaling, at least in part, by modulating the recruitment of ERα, ERβ and co-activators to target genes.


Royal jelly has estrogenic effects in vitro and in vivo.
Mishima S1, Suzuki KM, Isohama Y, Kuratsu N, Araki Y, Inoue M, Miyata T.

Author information
Abstract
Royal jelly (RJ) from honeybees (Apis mellifera) is traditionally thought to improve menopausal symptoms. The potential estrogenic activities of RJ were investigated using various approaches. RJ competed for binding of 17beta-estradiol to the human estrogen receptor alpha and beta but its affinities were weak compared with diethylstilbestrol and phytoestrogens. The reporter gene expression assays suggested that 0.1-1 mg/ml RJ activated estrogen receptors, leading to enhanced transcription of a reporter gene through an estrogen-responsive element. 1 mg/ml RJ stimulated the mRNA expression of estrogen-responsive pS2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by increasing gene transcription in MCF-7 cells. Treatment with RJ at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 1 mg/ml enhanced MCF-7 cell proliferation, but concomitant treatment with 1 microM tamoxifen blocked this effect. In vivo studies using ovariectomized rats showed that 17beta-estradiol (20 mg/kg, s.c.) treatment restored VEGF expression in both uterus and brain, whereas RJ (1 g/kg, s.c.) restored it in uterus but not in brain. These findings provide evidence that RJ has estrogenic activities through interaction with estrogen receptors followed by endogenous gene expressions.

PMID: 15946813  DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2005.04.012


Effect of royal jelly ingestion for six months on healthy volunteers.

Morita H1, Ikeda T, Kajita K, Fujioka K, Mori I, Okada H, Uno Y, Ishizuka T.

Author information

Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Royal jelly is a widely ingested supplement for health, but its effects on humans are not well known. The objective was to evaluate the effects of long-term royal jelly ingestion on humans.
METHODS:
We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. A total of 61 healthy volunteers aged 42-83 years were enrolled and were randomly divided into a royal jelly group (n = 31) and a control group (n = 30). Three thousand mg of royal jelly (RJ) or a placebo in 100 ml liquid/day were ingested for 6 months. The primary outcomes were changes in anthropometric measurements and biochemical indexes from baseline to 6 months after intervention.
RESULTS:
Thirty subjects in the RJ group and 26 in the control group were included in the analysis of endpoints. In an adjusted mean change of the variables from the baseline, significant differences between the two groups could be found in red blood cell counts (+0.16x10⁶/μL for the RJ group vs. -0.01x10⁶/μL for the control group, P = 0.0134), hematocrit (+0.9% vs. -0.8%, P = 0.0251), log (fasting plasma glucose) (+0.01 ± 0.01 log mg/dL vs. +0.05 ± 0.01 log mg/dL, P = 0.0297), log (insulinogenic index) (+0.25 vs. -0.13, P = 0.0319), log dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) (+0.08 log μg/dL vs. +0.20 log μg/dL, P = 0.0483), log testosterone (T) (+0.12 ± 0.04 log ng/mL vs. -0.02 ± 0.05 log ng/mL, P = 0.0416), log T/DHEA-S ratio (+0.05 ± 0.05 vs. -0.23 ± 0.59, P = 0.0015), and in one of the SF-36 subscale scores, mental health (MH) (+4 vs. -7, P = 0.0276).
CONCLUSIONS:
Six-month ingestion of RJ in humans improved erythropoiesis, glucose tolerance and mental health. Acceleration of conversion from DHEA-S to T by RJ may have been observed among these favorable effects.

EllaC

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I might grab more royal jelly today. Iv been wanting a whole food source of vitamins and minerals . I wonder if taking alongside bee pollen too would b overkill...Not re breasts but in general!

Lotus

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(20-09-2017, 07:52 PM) EllaC Wrote: Ok so please break this down in laymans terms? Fenugreek 600mg but no more?


Hi Ella, (I moved the question here...hope that's ok).

Ah....in layman huh?, shoot, ok I'll try lol. Though some info is unavoidably not in layman.

For instance...Saponins (as in FG) displace T (testosterone) bound to Sex-Hormone-Binding-Globulin (aka-SHBG), as a result this process raises estradiol because estradiol has a lower binding affinity for SHBG. 

And for this reason (as stated above) women don't need large doses of FG. The study indicated E2 rose in the second month using FG at a dosage of (standardized) 600mg FG extract, and my calculations from the study was that increase was approximately 50%, that's a significant increase. I believe the women in the study group had a higher BMI @ 31 though. So what does this mean????....lower BMI could possibly see higher increases.
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