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Poll: Pump and hold vs pump and release [Noogleberry]
This poll is closed.
Pump and hold
75.00%
6
75.00%
Pump and release
25.00%
2
25.00%
Total
8 vote(s)
100%
* You voted for this item.

Does pump and hold lead to saggy breasts?
#1
I mainly use the pump and hold method and I just read someone mention that it causes or leads to saggy breasts. Is that true?
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#2
It is only true if you use very high pressure. Pump and hold is much more effective than the pump and release methods. Tissue expansion is the same pressure held for a certain amount of time. 

I wouldn't use more than 5-7 pumps. When I had the pressure gauge from Noogleberrry, about 5 pumps was the equivalent to the pressure Brava used. If you are only using your Noogleberry for a couple hours a day though, I suggest a tiny bit more pressure. Maybe 6-7 pumps.
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#3
(05-02-2018, 01:26 AM)cutiesweets Wrote: It is only true if you use very high pressure. Pump and hold is much more effective than the pump and release methods. Tissue expansion is the same pressure held for a certain amount of time. 

I wouldn't use more than 5-7 pumps. When I had the pressure gauge from Noogleberrry, about 5 pumps was the equivalent to the pressure Brava used. If you are only using your Noogleberry for a couple hours a day though, I suggest a tiny bit more pressure. Maybe 6-7 pumps.


Oh okay. I have only ever used pump and hold. I do massage now 5 mins before the sessions. I will keep in never to do the 8th pump.

I pump and hold for four hours a day. 2 in morning and 2 at night. I really only release for a bit if the cup is pushing on my ribs too much. I have a bony structure. 
Is that too much? There is never any discomfort before, during or after the sessions. And I notice that my breasts look fuller after I longer sessions(2 hours). So that's why I have been doing this.
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#4
I think number of pumps is a poor way to describe pressure. It depends a lot on how much of the cup is air, vs boob. A nearly full cup and 7 pumps would remove most of the small amount of air creating high force, but if there is a lot of air in the cup, it will create little force. I agree in principle with the statement, that is pumping at low pressure will mean much slower growth, but less likely to create loose skin and saggy boobs. I think that this is only important near the end of your boob growth goal. Higher pressure will stretch the skin more and stimulate faster growth but will also create saggy boobs, but if you put up with that until near your desired size then start reducing pressure, say over the last 3 months or so, the breasts will firm up and not sag. Brava uses very low pressure because they recommend continuous wear for 10 hours or more, they are also well padded.


When you say pump and hold, are you talking about holding for more than an hour? You should not go for more than 15 minutes, then remove, massage for a minute or two with oil, then replace the cups for another 15 minutes. The main purpose of this is to provide temporary relief of the pressure at the edge of the cups on your rib cage. This edge pressure squeezes the skin and forces the blood out of this area (padding is another way to reduce this effect). Prolonged pressure and the skin will slowly die creating a scar. I have seen many pictures of women with severe ring mark scars that took up to two years to heal over and clear up, these women were devastated and one who was a brassiere model took up NBE because the photographers kept asking her to add padding. Her overly ambitious program resulted is significantly larger boobs, but horrible ring scars which cost her her job! Massage needs to include this area around the base of the breasts to restore blood flow and eliminate the depression in the skin caused by the dome.
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#5
(05-02-2018, 01:49 AM)Dark_Swan Wrote:
(05-02-2018, 01:26 AM)cutiesweets Wrote: It is only true if you use very high pressure. Pump and hold is much more effective than the pump and release methods. Tissue expansion is the same pressure held for a certain amount of time. 

I wouldn't use more than 5-7 pumps. When I had the pressure gauge from Noogleberrry, about 5 pumps was the equivalent to the pressure Brava used. If you are only using your Noogleberry for a couple hours a day though, I suggest a tiny bit more pressure. Maybe 6-7 pumps.


Oh okay. I have only ever used pump and hold. I do massage now 5 mins before the sessions. I will keep in never to do the 8th pump.

I pump and hold for four hours a day. 2 in morning and 2 at night. I really only release for a bit if the cup is pushing on my ribs too much. I have a bony structure. 
Is that too much? There is never any discomfort before, during or after the sessions. And I notice that my breasts look fuller after I longer sessions(2 hours). So that's why I have been doing this.


I think as long as your breasts do not turn purple, then you are not using too much pressure. They should only turn slightly red at most. If they turn purple, you are cutting off circulation to your breasts, which is never a good thing.
 Reply
#6
(05-02-2018, 02:54 AM)James98 Wrote: I think number of pumps is a poor way to describe pressure. It depends a lot on how much of the cup is air, vs boob. A nearly full cup and 7 pumps would remove most of the small amount of air creating high force, but if there is a lot of air in the cup, it will create little force. I agree in principle with the statement, that is pumping at low pressure will mean much slower growth, but less likely to create loose skin and saggy boobs. I think that this is only important near the end of your boob growth goal. Higher pressure will stretch the skin more and stimulate faster growth but will also create saggy boobs, but if you put up with that until near your desired size then start reducing pressure, say over the last 3 months or so, the breasts will firm up and not sag. Brava uses very low pressure because they recommend continuous wear for 10 hours or more, they are also well padded.


When you say pump and hold, are you talking about holding for more than an hour? You should not go for more than 15 minutes, then remove, massage for a minute or two with oil, then replace the cups for another 15 minutes. The main purpose of this is to provide temporary relief of the pressure at the edge of the cups on your rib cage. This edge pressure squeezes the skin and forces the blood out of this area (padding is another way to reduce this effect). Prolonged pressure and the skin will slowly die creating a scar. I have seen many pictures of women with severe ring mark scars that took up to two years to heal over and clear up, these women were devastated and one who was a brassiere model took up NBE because the photographers kept asking her to add padding. Her overly ambitious program resulted is significantly larger boobs, but horrible ring scars which cost her her job! Massage needs to include this area around the base of the breasts to restore blood flow and eliminate the depression in the skin caused by the dome.


Hm, I don't really agree on the removing every 15 minutes. I have been trying different pumping methods for years, and I did not start seeing results until I started using moderate pressure for at least a couple hours at a time without removing. As long as one uses some sort of padding and doesn't over pump, I do not think any harm is being done.

I know different methods work differently for different people though. Just sharing my experience. NBE is all about experimentation until you find what works best for you, after all.
 Reply
#7
Personally I think pump and release just acts to stretch the skin out and does nothing much for growth.   It's all about exposure hours to the negative air pressure so the more you pump (times) and the longer you pump, the faster you will grow.
 Reply
#8
(05-02-2018, 02:54 AM)James98 Wrote: I think number of pumps is a poor way to describe pressure. It depends a lot on how much of the cup is air, vs boob. A nearly full cup and 7 pumps would remove most of the small amount of air creating high force, but if there is a lot of air in the cup, it will create little force. I agree in principle with the statement, that is pumping at low pressure will mean much slower growth, but less likely to create loose skin and saggy boobs. I think that this is only important near the end of your boob growth goal. Higher pressure will stretch the skin more and stimulate faster growth but will also create saggy boobs, but if you put up with that until near your desired size then start reducing pressure, say over the last 3 months or so, the breasts will firm up and not sag. Brava uses very low pressure because they recommend continuous wear for 10 hours or more, they are also well padded.


When you say pump and hold, are you talking about holding for more than an hour? You should not go for more than 15 minutes, then remove, massage for a minute or two with oil, then replace the cups for another 15 minutes. The main purpose of this is to provide temporary relief of the pressure at the edge of the cups on your rib cage. This edge pressure squeezes the skin and forces the blood out of this area (padding is another way to reduce this effect). Prolonged pressure and the skin will slowly die creating a scar. I have seen many pictures of women with severe ring mark scars that took up to two years to heal over and clear up, these women were devastated and one who was a brassiere model took up NBE because the photographers kept asking her to add padding. Her overly ambitious program resulted is significantly larger boobs, but horrible ring scars which cost her her job! Massage needs to include this area around the base of the breasts to restore blood flow and eliminate the depression in the skin caused by the dome.


100% agreed !!!
 Reply
#9
(04-02-2018, 11:09 PM)Dark_Swan Wrote: I mainly use the pump and hold method and I just read someone mention that it causes or leads to saggy breasts. Is that true?


I recommend a pump with a gauge so you know exactly how much negative pressure you are using.  A simple brake bleeder pump will work.
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